Nevada's Sesquicentennial

      October 31, 1864 - October 31, 2014

Comstock Mining honors Nevada’s Sesquicentennial

Comstock Mining honors Nevada’s Sesquicentennial

As the Silver State celebrates its 150th birthday on October 31st, Comstock Mining said it is issuing the first pure Comstock silver coin since the U.S. Mint facility in Carson City, Nevada, closed in 1893.

“The silver was mined safely and responsibly, with the highest environmental standards, directly from the historic Comstock Mining District,” said the Virginia City, Nevada-based Comstock Mining, which is aiming for an annual production of 40,000 gold equivalent ounces at its Lucerne and Dayton mines.

“Each medallion is an expression of the deep heritage of the great Comstock Lode, famous for generating enormous wealth, facilitating statehood for Nevada in 1864, and shaping mining practices worldwide for over six decades,” said Comstock Mining.

Each medallion will be minted from one troy ounce of pure .9999 silver. Lake Tahoe, Nevada, artist Ron Oden developed the images for the coin.

Globally renowned as homestead of the Cartwright family of “Bonanza” TV fame, the Comstock Lode and Virginia City are now home to Comstock Mining.

As the Silver State celebrates its 150th birthday on October 31st, Comstock Mining said it is issuing the first pure Comstock silver coin since the U.S. Mint facility in Carson City, Nevada, closed in 1893.

“The silver was mined safely and responsibly, with the highest environmental standards, directly from the historic Comstock Mining District,” said the Virginia City, Nevada-based Comstock Mining, which is aiming for an annual production of 40,000 gold equivalent ounces at its Lucerne and Dayton mines.

“Each medallion is an expression of the deep heritage of the great Comstock Lode, famous for generating enormous wealth, facilitating statehood for Nevada in 1864, and shaping mining practices worldwide for over six decades,” said Comstock Mining.

Each medallion will be minted from one troy ounce of pure .9999 silver. Lake Tahoe, Nevada, artist Ron Oden developed the images for the coin.

The first major silver ore discovery in the United States, the Comstock Lode was considered the greatest mining discovery since the discovery of gold in California 11 years earlier in 1849. It yielded 33 bonanza discoveries in its heyday.

The Comstock Lode was not only notable for the incredible fortunes it generated for Silver Kings Mackay, Fair, Flood and O’Brien, it would build the state of Nevada, as well as San Francisco, California.

German mining engineer, Philip Deischimer, the superintendent of Virginia City’s Ophir Mine, would invent square-set timbering to solve the cave-in problem of the Comstock Lode mines, a method still in use today.

The family of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert A. Michelson--famed for his discoveries regarding measuring the speed of light--would emigrate from Prussia and settle in Virginia City during the heyday of the Comstock Lode.

During the glory days of the Comstock, fellow Prussian immigrant Adolph Sutro raised $3 million for tunnels to drain water from local mines. Sutro’s tunnels would drain three to four million gallons of water per day, earning Sutro an average of $10,000 daily. His wealth increased by real estate investments in San Francisco; Sutro would become mayor of San Francisco.

The Comstock District produced a grand total of 8.2 million ounces of gold and 192 million ounces of silver. Peak production from the Comstock occurred in 1877, with mines yielding more than $14 million in gold and $21 million dollar of silver that year, now valued in excess of $310 million in gold and more than $465.1 million in silver.

Comstock Mining Inc

Address: P.O. Box 1118, Virginia City, Nevada 89440

Main: 775.847.5272

Investors: 775.847.0545

Fax: 800.750.5740